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Celebrating New Orleans' Tricentennial
Steve Gleason
Steve Gleason

Tulane’s motto, non sibi sed suis—which means, not for one’s self, but for one’s own— embodies who we are and what we stand for. We are entrepreneurs on the front lines of life-changing technologies, as well as hometown heroes. Tulanians see challenges as opportunities, and strive to improve the lives of others in our own community and around the globe. Here’s TU the next 300 for the place we call home!

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Times-Picayune ad featuring Dinwiddie Hall
Office of Sustainability

At Tulane, we believe that small changes on-campus can make a big difference in our carbon footprint. We depend on the ideas of our students, faculty and staff to help reduce waste and enhance our ecosystems. From campus-wide recycling programs to LEED certified buildings, we are working to protect our local and global environment. Here's TU the next 300 years for the place we call home!

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New Orleans Advocate ad featuring Alyssa Cruse
The Power of Tulane - Alyssa Cruse

At Tulane, we don't stand down, we stand out. Whether they're on stage or conducting research, students pursue their individual passions. From music to neuroscience, we tackle local and global challenges with dedication and resilience. Here's TU the next 300 years for the place we call home!

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New Orleans Advocate ad featuring Asis Lopez
The Power of Tulane - Asis Lopez

At Tulane, we don't stand down, we stand out. Whether they're in the board room or in the lab, students pursue their individual passions. From social engagement to bioinnovation, we tackle local and global challenges with dedication and resilience. Here's TU the next 300 years for the place we call home!

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Tulane has called New Orleans home since 1834. Together, we have created a community that’s unlike anywhere else in the world. Tulanians are resilient, just like our home town. We are at the forefront of groundbreaking research, logging thousands of community service hours and dedicated to preserving the history and culture of our great city. Celebrating the 300th anniversary of New Orleans is not just about marking where we’ve been, but seeing where we will go together. Here’s TU the next 300 for the city we call home!

Among the many wonderful collections housed at Tulane is the Louisiana Research Collection. This is New Orleans’ most comprehensive collection archives, with almost four linear miles of documents from the founding of the city to the present. 

 

Tulane University was founded in New Orleans in 1834 as the Medical College of Louisiana. It was established to train doctors to fight the epidemics of cholera and yellow fever plaguing the city. The Tulane visions for public health, medicine, research, and public service to our city continue as we celebrate the New Orleans Tricentennial.

 

 

Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine is the oldest school of public health in the country, and was also home to the first female dean for a school of public health, Grace Goldsmith. 

CACTUS, the Community Action Council for Tulane University students, was established in 1968. As Tulane’s oldest and largest community service organization, CACTUS facilitates all service projects and organizations on campus in addition to sponsoring campus-wide service events. 

Tulane Alumnus John Kennedy Toole won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981 for his posthumously published novel, A Confederacy of Dunces. The Louisiana Research Collection in Jones Hall has a collection of Toole’s personal and literary papers.  

Clara Gregory Baer, physical education teacher at Newcomb College, authored the first book of rules for women’s basketball under the name “Basquette.” Baer also invented the game “Newcomb,” akin to volleyball, and was a leader for greater freedom for women in sports and dress.  

President Gerald R. Ford announced the end of the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War during a speech given in the Central Building (now Avron B. Fogelman Arena in the Devlin Fieldhouse) at Tulane on April 23, 1975 

McAlister Auditorium, which contains the world’s largest self-suspended concrete dome, was built in 1940 by local architects Favrot and Reed. Amelie McAlister Upshur bequeathed the Art Deco building as a memorial to her mother.  

The New Orleans Saints played their first home football game in front of 80,879 fans in Tulane Stadium on September 17, 1967. Tulane Stadium went on to hold three of the first nine Super Bowls (1970, 1972, 1975).